Lynnae Aguilar

NMLS# 210683

Senior Loan Officer

Lynnae Aguilar
Senior Loan Officer

NMLS# 210683
State Lic: UT # 5636574; ID # MLO-19574;
2297 N Hill Field Road
Suite 103
Layton, UT 84041
Direct: (801) 614-5138
Mobile: (801) 336-6167
Fax: (801) 217-3458

Lynnae was great and fun to work with she is very knowledgable. Melissa was also very helpful. Academy really helped make this a nice transition.Sterling Bryant
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It’s all about service at Academy Mortgage, and our company has been meeting the needs of homebuyers across the United States since 1988. I joined Academy because of its strong reputation for integrity-based mortgage lending, its unwavering commitment to responsible lending practices, and for its broad portfolio of mortgage solutions and tools.

Since joining Academy, I have helped many individuals and families attain the dream of homeownership. Whether you want to buy a new home or refinance an existing mortgage, I will provide a customized solution for you at competitive rates. No brokering, no middleman, no hassle, no surprises.

Academy is a direct lender, which means that my Branch and Regional Offices are equipped to complete the entire loan process in-house—all loan processing, underwriting, closings, and funding are handled locally. As a result, we have a proven track record of closing loans as quickly and efficiently as possible.

I will be in control of your loan file from start to finish, and I will be up-to-date on the status of your loan at all times. I understand the importance of maintaining continuous communication throughout the loan process and commit to providing you accurate, timely, and honest mortgage advice.

I invite you to put us to the test. Let me show you how simple and easy securing a mortgage can be.


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NMLS# 210683

State Lic: UT: 5636574; ID: MLO-19574;

Corp Lic: UT: 5491140-MLCO; ID: MBL-671;


How to find the perfect real estate agent

Making a home purchase is a big decision and a huge financial commitment. With the stakes so high, it's nice to have someone in your court to help you find a suitable home and advise you on making a good offer - this person, of course, is your real estate agent.

Finding a real estate agent that you like to work with and has your best interests in mind is the first step many people take in their house-hunting journey. But it takes more than just finding the first agent a Google search comes up with; it's important to know that the agent is experienced in finding the type of home you're looking for and is someone you can get along with.

Ask the right questions

Before looking at homes and reviewing residential mortgage options, interview a handful of agents to choose the right person to hire. Ask them:

If an agent is new to the industry or new to your area, he or she may not have the industry knowledge to find your ideal spot. This is one reason it's important to inquire about how the agent plans to find you homes to tour.

Some agents simply review the multiple listing service and quickly search for homes in your price range and preferred neighborhoods. Sometimes, this simple step is enough to find your ideal home; other times, a little more legwork is necessary. A dedicated and experienced agent will know how to seek out homes that aren't on the market yet or how to issue a direct mail campaign for their client, NerdWallet explained.

Look at their backgrounds

There are certain licenses and certifications that real estate agents either must or may want to pursue. Find out which qualifications your potential agents have.

First off, they should be licensed by the state you're looking for a house in. You can usually find this information online, Bankrate noted. Additionally, you may be able to find about any complaints filed against the agent through the regulatory body that licensed him or her. This information is good to know before moving forward with this person.

Next, find out what additional certifications the person pursued. An important one is a National Association of Realtors membership - this means the person knows, understands and adheres to a code of ethics with their clients. Other distinctions might include:

Agents may list these designations on their website or in acronyms on their business cards. Or, you can simply ask about additional training they've completed.

Make it official

Once you've determined who the best agent for you is, it's time to move forward with that person. Agents typically want their clients to be exclusive to them. Real estate agents make their money on the buying or selling of a home; if your agent helps you find a home but you wind up closing the deal with another agent, that person did a lot of work for no payout.

To protect themselves from getting swindled by inconsiderate or uninformed buyers, many agents require clients to sign a buyer's agent agreement. If you sign this form, legally you can't go with another agent unannounced. But, if you find that you and the agent aren't a good fit, you can terminate the contract and move on with someone else, reported.

If you haven't signed a contract but have met with the agent on several occasions, that person might assume (whether correctly or incorrectly) that you are exclusively working with him or her. This could simply be a rookie mistake on the agent's part, so you might want to step up and get clarification.

"Once you've found this special agent, you should sign a buyer's agent agreement to make it official," Rosanne Nitti, a california-based Realtor with RMN Investments & Realty Services. "This means you can both move forward with confidence - which is important when you're embarking on something as huge as buying a home."

Academy Mortgage is one of the top independent purchase lenders in the country as ranked in the 2015 CoreLogic Marketrac Report. Visit to find a loan, get a rate, or calculate your payment today.


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Debunked: 5 down payment myths you probably still believe

More than 200 million Americans live in homes they own themselves, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Still, despite the large percentage of the population that has successfully gone through the homebuying process, it remains a mystery to many citizens. For those considering a home purchase this year, myths about what is necessary to buy a home may keep them from joining the 64 percent of the country who live in owner-occupied houses.

Here are 5 down payment myths you probably still believe, but shouldn't:

Myth No. 5: I need a 20% down payment.

Many people have heard that a 20% down payment - at minimum - is required to obtain a residential mortgage. This myth became popular because it's generally recommended that most people have a 20% down payment ready when they wish to buy a home. However, that doesn't mean it's necessary. In fact, the typical down payment today is between 5 and 10%, according to SmartAsset.

Myth No. 4: My down payment has to be all my own money.

For many people, the most challenging aspect of buying a home is saving for the down payment, according to the National Association of Realtors. While the majority of people use their own money for the down payment, this is hardly required. Freddie Mac pointed out that there are several options for those saving up for a home, including:

Myth No. 3: Down payment assistance programs are only for first-timers.

Down payment assistance programs can be a wonderful help to first-time homebuyers who are new to the world of real estate. But, as any second-time homebuyer may tell you, it's not always smooth sailing on your second go-round.

This is particularly true for those who haven't gone through the homebuying process in several years. And, considering the average time spent in a home is a decade, it seems safe to say that most home sellers are out of practice when it comes to navigating a home purchase.

Because of this, the definition of "first-time homebuyer" is a bit more complicated than one might assume. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, a first-time homebuyer is someone who:

Beyond these many definitions, it's important to note that not all down payment assistance programs specify that they're only available to first-timers.

Myth No. 2: Programs are only available in big cities.

Down payment and homebuyer assistance programs are available in every corner of the country. Every homebuyer, whether they're living in a big, bustling city like Los Angeles or New York City, or in a tiny, rural community, has access to a program that can simplify the homebuying journey. To find one for you, begin by browsing through the state housing agency loans available through Academy Mortgage.

Myth No. 1: Down payments are always required.

Not every home purchase is secured with a down payment. Crazy as it sounds (especially if you believed you needed as much as 20%), some homes can be bought with no cash down. Here are two popular 100% financing options you can look into:

VA Loans

If you or your spouse is a veteran, an active-duty service member or a part of a reserve program, you could qualify for a VA loan, and may not be required to make a down payment upfront.

USDA Loans

Also called farmers' or rural loans, the U.S. Department of Agriculture backs these loans which encourage buyers to make a home purchase in qualifying areas of the country. While their name suggests that it only applies to far-away plains, it actually encompasses some surprisingly suburban areas. While you won't find a qualifying home in the center of a major metropolitan area, you'll likely find one within driving distance. Check out the USDA website to explore eligible areas.

Academy Mortgage is one of the top independent purchase lenders in the country as ranked in the 2015 CoreLogic Marketrac Report. Visit to find a loan, get a rate, or calculate your payment today.